ORIGIN OF NOVEL COLOR PHENOTYPES: CONTRIBUTION OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF BIOCHEMICAL NETWORKS

picture of Sarah Davis presenting his/her poster: ORIGIN OF NOVEL COLOR PHENOTYPES: CONTRIBUTION OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF BIOCHEMICAL NETWORKS

Sarah Davis , Erin S. Morrison, Alexander V. Badyaev

ORIGIN OF NOVEL COLOR PHENOTYPES: CONTRIBUTION OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF BIOCHEMICAL NETWORKS

Identifying how evolutionary diversification is affected by changes in the static and dynamic properties of deterministic networks underlying phenotypic traits is important in understanding both the overall stability of a phenotype and its evolutionary trajectory. Here we capitalize on a known historical sequence of population establishment of the house finch (Haemorphous mexicanus) across Montana to study the evolution of color-producing enzymatic pathways that underlie population divergence in color phenotypes. We examined the relative contribution of structural properties and functional dynamics of enzymatic networks of carotenoids to population divergence among more than 30 recently established populations. We first examined differences in the static structural components of these networks at within- and among population levels. Second, we analyzed the relationship between changes in the concentrations of carotenoids and their topological position in the network within- and among populations. These results provide insight into the evolution of control of metabolic flux in these networks in particular, and into the mechanisms of phenotypic divergence within a species in general.

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