Effects of glass surface hydrophobicity and glass surface charges in improving lipid bilayer stability for ion channel-based sensors

picture of Lin Ma presenting his/her poster: Effects of glass surface hydrophobicity and glass surface charges in improving lipid bilayer stability for ion channel-based sensors

Lin Ma , Leonard K. Bright, and Craig A. Aspinwall

Effects of glass surface hydrophobicity and glass surface charges in improving lipid bilayer stability for ion channel-based sensors

Biochemical sensors are designed to quantify cellular activities of single molecules and convert their cellular activities to electronic signals. As an alternative to cell based sensors, artificial lipids are used, but they are not stable in most cases. This project seeks to develop a lipid bilayer based sensor for rapid and label free detection of molecules, such as hormones and neurotransmitters. My work was to investigate stable lipid bilayers on glass. The formation of lipid monolayers on glass aids in the formation of suspended bilayers to across glass pipette aperture. Monolayer can be achieved by modifying glass surface by modifiers such as 3-cyanopropyldimethychlorosilane (CDS), ethyldimethylchlorosilane (EDS) and n-octyldimethylchlorosilane (ODS). The stability of bilayer incurred many interests in investigating the glass surface hydrophobicity and glass surface charge. To verify the modification of glass pipettes apertures, glass substrates were used as models. We used static water contact angle instrument to test the surface hydrophobicity and we found that modified glass surface yielded high contact angles compared to untreated glass. In addition, surface charge of glass was investigated by silica particle. Using Zetasizer instrument, we found that modifiers react with silanol groups on glass surface, thus glass surface becomes neutral. Therefore, we conclude that glass surface becomes hydrophobic by adding modifiers to glass surface and modification doesn?t generate electric static forces to interrupt the bilayer formation on glass pipette. My work was supported by grants from National Science Foundation (NSF) and Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI).

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