SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF PRISTINE, A FUNGICIDE, ON HONEYBEE (APIS MELLIFERA) HEALTH

picture of Austin Brown presenting his/her poster: SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF PRISTINE, A FUNGICIDE, ON HONEYBEE (APIS MELLIFERA) HEALTH

Austin Brown , Mark Carroll, Gloria DeGrandi-Hoffman

SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF PRISTINE, A FUNGICIDE, ON HONEYBEE (APIS MELLIFERA) HEALTH

The sublethal effects of pesticides on the honeybee (Apis mellifera) are of concern for farmers and beekeepers alike. Exposure to minute quantities of insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides that have been sprayed on crops has been postulated to lower the honeybee’s ability to pollinate as well as to play a part in Colony Collapse Disorder. The fungicide Pristine®, comprised of pyraclostrobin and boscalid, was sprayed onto pollen at treatments of 1x, 10x, and null, then fed to small, established colonies placed in a greenhouse: removed from the environment. Gas-phase volatile emissions of queens were collected using Tenax absorbent filters before and after fungicide exposure. Analysis done with an Agilent GC-MS showed relative amounts of E-β-ocimene dropped after treatment. This compound, characteristic of only mated, laying queen bees, may express a queen’s viability to her workers. Other important pheromone substituents such as n-nonanal, n-decanal, and some long-chain alkanes may be affected as well. Additionally, workers seem affected by sublethal exposure. Concentrations of important sugars needed for flight, such as trehalose and fructose, and viral titers present in hemolymph may reveal the impact of Pristine® on the degradation of the health and vitality of workers and of the colony as a whole.

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