UNDERSTANDING HOPI PERSPECTIVES ON TOBACCO USE AND CANCER THROUGH FOCUS GROUPS

picture of Erelda Gene presenting his/her poster: UNDERSTANDING HOPI PERSPECTIVES ON TOBACCO USE AND CANCER THROUGH FOCUS GROUPS

Erelda Gene , Rebecca Scranton, Priscilla Sanderson, PhD.

UNDERSTANDING HOPI PERSPECTIVES ON TOBACCO USE AND CANCER THROUGH FOCUS GROUPS

Purpose: The purpose of the focus groups were to obtain Hopi perspectives toward cancer and tobacco use.

 

Methods: Seven focus groups were conducted with Hopi adults (four on the Hopi reservation and three in Flagstaff). A community-based participatory action research (CBPR) was conducted with NAU and Hopi Tribal project team.  The reservation participant inclusion criteria was: living on the Hopi reservation for at least six months, be 18 years or older, and an enrolled member of the Hopi Tribe. The urban participant inclusion criteria was living in an urban area for at least six months. After transcribing qualitative data, the data was analyzed using a consensus model for themes in coordination with the Hopi project team, and Atlas t.i., for mapping themes.

 

Conclusions/Implications: Preliminary result shows that unless an individual was closely impacted by cancer their desire to seek knowledge was limited. The urban focus groups seemed to be more influenced by media in their knowledge of cancer whereas, reservation groups shared their personal experiences of cancer and tobacco-related health issues.

          Hopi people believe that traditional tobacco has a sacred meaning and is seen as a way to carry the Hopi prayers to the sky. Commercial tobacco is connected to increased health problems and is seen as contaminated and impure.

          Due to the CBPR, the Hopi project team and NAU undergraduate research assistants gained knowledge and experience in the conduct of focus groups.

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